19th Century Traditional Jewels 👑✨

A gorgeous selection of late 19th century transitional jewels underscore the seamless transition of the geometry of the 1860's, to the archaeology of the 1870's. to the aestheticism of the 1880's, into the pre-Edwardian golden age of 1890. This chronological collection has a jewel for every level of collection.

This first treasure is a timeless 9k Train-Car Style Prince Albert Chain. Although the watch chain has been in circulation since the 16th Century, the Albert watch chain was introduced much later. During the 19th Century Albert chains were first seen named after a style of watch chain Prince Albert wore during the Victorian period. The chain would traditionally feature a T-bar on one end used to affix the chain to a vest buttonhole.  This one makes a perfect stack addition or iconic chocker with its triple hallmarked T-bar and two-tone train-car spacers. The soft hand-faceted rollo links are a glorious addition to any texture collection. English, Birmingham hallmarked.

Next up we have an exceptional 15k Archaeological Revival Locket. Evolving from ancient amulets, European designs for lockets appear to date to the 16th century, when small pendants were worn to conceal good luck charms, small fabric squares soaked in perfume to ward off the poor smells on public thoroughfares, painted portraits, and even, on occasion, poison.This locket features delicious sculpted fringe and large scale boules around the top details, red fabric interior, and original bail. The locket is in excellent condition and is a dramatic example of the archaeological revival period aesthetic that really set the tone of 1870s English fashions.


Lastly and favorite on our list for this week is a delightfully sassy pair of Glass Acorn Earrings in 14k. With 14k tops, textured details set these sweet earrings apart. Likely components from a larger piece, I am so much a fan of these earrings with their classic victorian whimsey; acorns were much beloved by the aesthetic movement that focused on the beauty of nature and rebirth in mundane, often organic themes.

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